BY-WAYS - 12/5/40 - COOKIES

A neighbor says, "Why do you take on the chore
Of making your cookies? There's many a store
That quite underbids you on their total cost;
Besides, there's your time, and your energy lost."
"But I have a priceless ingredient here
That stores just don't carry - for these children dear;
My love; and that love reaches its happy goal
By feeding the body, the spirit, the soul."
***

Speaking of cookies, I would like to pass along a recipe that traveled here from Saltsburg. It is a great favorite with all our family; and I am so grateful to my Saltsburg friend that I would like to give her name; but since I have not yet received her O.K., I must refrain. Here is the recipe:

CRY BABIES
(Drop Ginger Cookies)
1 cup shortening
2 t. cinnamon
1 cup white sugar
(1 cup raisins)
1 cup molasses
Salt to taste
2 eggs 5 cups flour
2 t. ginger
2 1/2 t. soda, dissolved in hot coffee

Drop by spoon and bake.
(Not too hot oven.)


If you must have your sulphur-and-molasses in the spring, you can buy nice little sulphur tablets, then push them down with these delectable cookies. ***

I used to wonder why I couldn't have been born a man; I like men's occupations (except office work) so much better than women's, and find their world - of machinery, and wood-carving, cabinet-making, etc., much more exciting than knitting, crocheting, and making quilts. But the consolation of being a woman is that you can contribute so directly to the pleasure of other people - especially little children. If the saying is true that "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach," that is doubly true for boys. And I honestly believe that the best approach to a boy's soul is through the esophagus. (That holds for girls, too.) So much of the so-called drudgery of life is an attitude of mind. Like the two workers on one of the famous cathedrals; one said, "I am cutting stone - all day long." The other said, "I am building a cathedral."

Years ago Angelo Patri, the great educator, said to us mothers, in one of his syndicated articles, "Don't think of your cooking as mere cooking, but say to yourself, "I am building a man (or a woman)." Even a slim food budget can be fun (for awhile), if you make a game out of it. The Lord loveth not only a cheerful giver, but also a cheerful saver.

After this dreadful war is over, there will be some great books written - about the amazing fortitude of the English during all this bombing. Think of the city of Coventry, with a twelve-hour rain of bombs that almost wiped out the city. A correspondent tells how the shop-keepers calmly gathered up what was left of their merchandise, put up their signs, 'Business as usual," and one merchant added, "Nuts to Hitler." A spirit like that knows no defeat.

Speaking again of food, surely we are going to send shipload after shipload to those desolate peoples of Europe. We pride ourselves on being the greatest democracy on earth; but, as Boake Carter says, that name will be a mockery unless we come to the rescue of helpless countries like Finland; brave, honorable Finland, who paid off her debts and fought a good fight to keep her integrity. The Red Cross has taught us that we are our brothers' keepers.

Sincerely,
Florence B. Taylor

Next - 1/15/42 - Portrait of a Surgeon

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